My Little Cupcake Pop Review

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If you’re browsing recipes online for cupcakes or cakes, chances are you’ll come across a handful or cupcake pops or cake pops.  They are so “in” these days and everyone is doing it!  They’ve even branched out to sticking other things on lollipop sticks, like mini apple pies and macarons.  I guess there’s just something about miniature food on sticks that people love!  In this post, I will reveal the technique I used to create the Valentine’s Day cupcake pops that were in the background photos of my previous post – I used the cupcake pop mold from My Little Cupcake Pop.

Before I even begin on the details of the mold, I have to say that designing a cupcake pop mold is a genius idea.  Bakerella’s original method of using a flower-shaped cookie cutter was good back then (how else would you have made a cupcake pop?), but there really needed to be an easier way to shape a ball of cake into a cupcake.  Along came My Little Cupcake Pop founder, Jeanette Facey.  She was inspired to design a cupcake mold after watching Bakerella’s segment on making cupcake pops on The Martha Stewart Show.  She began making cupcake pops for family, friends, parties and school events but found the process of shaping the cake balls into cupcakes was a bit tricky and time-consuming.  She searched high and low for some sort of something to help her out with her cupcake pops, but when she could find nothing she decided to make her own mold.

I’ve had the My Little Cupcake Pop mold for well over a year now, but haven’t had the need/desire to make any cupcake pops.  While planning my previous post, I thought that it was the perfect opportunity to finally break out the cupcake pop mold.  I used this Tim Tam cookie truffle recipe, although you could Oreos, cookie dough or the traditional cake/frosting mix.  I had read before about the dough sticking to the inside of the mold but I decided to try one out first to see how it went (Jeanette recommends using a cooking-oil spray, or even powdered sugar or cocoa powder if you find the dough sticking).

Start by having your mix prepared and your cupcake pop mold at the ready.  Grab up a bit of the mix with your hands and roll it into a ball, about the size of the mold, maybe about 1-inch in diameter.  Place the ball into one side of the mold and close it firmly.  Brush off any excess mix that might squeeze out of the edges, then open the mold.  To remove it, you could try gently pulling it out, or use a finger and push down and out on top of the cupcake mix.  You may get a little indentation, but it shouldn’t distract from the shape of the final cupcake pop, especially if you’ll be putting a decoration directly on the top.  Place the cupcakes on a sheet of baking paper.  Again, if you have trouble removing the dough, for your next ball, use a bit of cooking-oil spray, powdered sugar or cocoa powder.  I didn’t have any trouble at all removing mine.

How perfect is that!  Upon shaping all of your mix, refrigerate your mini cupcakes for 10-15 minutes.  This will make them firmer and easier to work with (less likely to fall apart).  While refrigerating, start melting your chocolate or candy melts that you’ll use for the bottom of the pops.  I used chocolate – dark chocolate for the bottoms and white chocolate for the tops.  Have your lollipop sticks sitting nearby.  After refrigerating, pick up one of the cupcakes by the top and dip the bottom into the melted chocolate or candy melts to thoroughly coat the bottom.  If you have something to sit the cupcake pop upside down on (like an empty egg carton, or whatever), place it there.  Otherwise, with your other hand, dip the end of a lollipop stick into the melted chocolate/candy melts, then push the stick into the bottom of the cupcake pop (coating the stick with chocolate/candy melts help to hold it inside the cupcake better).  Place the pops into clean styrofoam or cups filled with sugar.

Refrigerate the cupcake pops for a few minutes until the chocolate hardens.  While doing so, start melting the chocolate or candy melts that you’ll use for the top of your pops.  Take the cupcake pops out of the refrigerator.  Holding the pops upside down, by the stick, dip the top of the pops into the melted chocolate or candy melts.  Place the pops back into the styrofoam or sugar-filled cups.  Stick on your decorations as soon as you finish dipping each pop, otherwise the chocolate will harden and you won’t be able to get any sprinkles to stick!  If possible, you can stick the pops back in the refrigerator to harden.  Once the chocolate has hardened, you can store the pops lying down in a container in the refrigerator.

Well, that was my method of making these cupcake pops.  Jeanette’s children have created their own video tutorial, which you may find even more helpful (and cute!)…

My cupcake pops were for Valentine’s Day, and they were my special treat for my children’s after school snack that day!  They loved them, of course!

I just filled a glass with sugar and sprinkled the top with mini heart sprinkles to make it extra pretty!

If you’re a big fan of cupcake pops, you’re going to want one of these My Little Cupcake Pop molds!  If you’re after the classic sphere or other neat shapes, My Little Cupcake Pop has that sorted – you can now get the classic cake ball shape, a heart shape (for Valentine’s Day) and a cone shape (for making Christmas trees).  Buy them in a variety pack here for $22.95 (plus shipping).  You can also buy each mold individually, as well as supplies you’ll need for decorating your pops at the My Little Cupcake Pop online shop.

Note: I have not been paid by or asked by My Little Cupcake Pop to write this review.  I simply wanted to let others know about the cupcake pop mold, as I think it’s a great find!

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